WoodWeek – 18 July 2018

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Greetings from your WoodWeek news team. Wow, it didn't take long for the manoeuvring by China’s wood manufacturers to start. Our first story today shows the Chinese aren’t about to take the USA tariffs lying down. Clearly there is a lot of export earnings at stake.

Until recently, New Zealand property developers had been slow to adopt the engineered timber structures in contrast to leaders in Australia and USA. Now, more engineers here are recognising engineered wood’s advantages with new building information modelling technology for designing commercial buildings. In August a national conference on engineered wood for commercial and multi-residential building is set to attract hundreds of early adopters as New Zealand moves fast to catch up to our Australian neighbours in sustainable commercial buildings.

The Changing Perceptions Conference has a full one-day programme on 28 August at the Distinction Hotel in Rotorua. The event begins with an evening reception on 27 August. Register now at www.connexevents.com/cpetc2018. Early-bird discounts finish this Friday, 20 July.

If a tree falls in a forest and there’s nobody around, does the truck that picks it up make a noise? Not much of one, if it’s the latest offering from Swedish start-up Einride, an all-electric autonomous semi looking to carve out a niche in the log truck market there.

FIEA's upcoming forest safety conference in August features positive evidence that forest contractors and managers have really embraced new safety applications. The early adopters have proven the new systems are vital to embedding safety in their daily work practices on the forest floor.

FISC engaged the Bravegen team led by Chris Lindley to develop practical software to suit forest-based worker teams and their bosses. A key part of their brief was to ensure SafeTree could be used in a practical way for working safely.

Lindley says there has been a very positive response by the forest industry in general to adopt their new applications. He adds they understand the new certification system is ideal to help them make their businesses safer for everyone out on the forest floor.

Both Chris Lindley and Fiona Ewing from FISC are contributing to the conference. The Forest Safety & Technology Conference series will showcase how our forestry leaders have delivered both safety and productivity benefits for people across a range of workplaces. Register now at: www.forestsafety.events.

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Technology helps wood in commercial building

Until recently, New Zealand developers had been slow to adopt the engineered timber structures in contrast to leaders in Australia, USA. Now, more engineers here are recognising engineered wood’s advantages with new building information modelling technology for designing commercial buildings.

In August a national conference on engineered wood for commercial and multi- residential building is set to attract hundreds of early adopters as New Zealand moves fast to catch up our Australian neighbours in sustainable commercial buildings.

One distinct advantage is speed. Engineered wood buildings are erected much faster than traditional poured concrete slabs and on-site welded steel columns. The key to wood’s speed and accuracy comes from using new design and manufacturing software known as “building information modelling” (BIM). Engineered wood structures are ripe for using these highly accurate systems and automated machining technologies.

“Following trends in Australia and USA the use of engineered wood is growing as BIM becomes more widely used by complete project teams – from engineers and architects right through to the tradies,” says John Stulen, conference director for the 3rd Annual “Changing Perceptions” engineered wood conference on sustainable commercial building.

“The shorter project times have also caught the eye of all of leading trades contractors, especially when their people see BIM in action on a tall wood building project,” says Stulen.

“This year we are delighted to have all 100% of our conference case studies outlining New Zealand wood projects,” he adds.

The conference will include case studies for both wood and BIM:
    • The timber structure for a multi-story office complex that Sir Bob Jones, now under construction in downtown Wellington;
    • Naylor Love has completed the Otago Polytechnic student accommodation building and is soone to finish the new Nelson airport terminal;
    • Cross-laminated timber producer XLAM has joined forces with Housing Corporation to deliver emergency housing solutions faster than ever before;
    • Leading architects, Jasmax, designed a stunning apartment building – Merchant Quarter 2 – over a carpark in Grey Lynn, Auckland

This national conference has grown since 2016. It now attracts a wide audience of architects, engineers, developers, quantity surveyors and specifiers, as well as building officials and leading specialist trades, focused on commercial buildings; like electricians and plumbers and heating/ventilating/air conditioning specialist and leading practitioners.

The “Changing Perceptions” Conference has full one-day programme on 28 August at the Distinction Hotel in Rotorua. Early-bird registration discounts finish this Friday, 20 July.

The event begins with an evening reception on 27 August. Register now at: www.connexevents.com/cpetc2018.

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Has China found a way to avoid US tariffs?

Here’s what popped in our global trade news scan this week:

=> Trump Administration to impose 10% tariffs on imports of wood flooring from China;

=> Chinese wood companies relocate to Vietnam to avoid US duties.

=> Has China found a trade war loophole? Officials tout ‘made in Vietnam’ zones on border amid US tensions

=> Bonded areas could provide shelter for manufacturers hit by US tariffs – if China can convince its southern neighbour to get the plan moving;

=> The potential for a spiralling trade battle between Beijing and Washington is an unwelcome development for China. But in Guangxi, where seven “cross-border trade zones” with Vietnam are planned, local officials can see an opportunity.

More >>





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Electric robo-truck at home in forest

Sweden’s Electric Robo-truck is made for life in the forest – If a TREE falls in a forest and there’s nobody around, does the truck that comes in to pick it up make a noise? Not much of one, if it’s the latest offering from Swedish startup Einride, an all-electric autonomous semi looking to carve out a niche in an increasingly crowded (but not yet entirely real) market.

The new truck, unveiled last at the Goodwood Festival of Speed in the UK, is the T- log. Like on the T-pod, the truck Einride unveiled last year, there’s no cab or engine, just a skinny, sculpted, white slab up front. At the back are upright supports to hold the logs in place. Company engineers have beefed up the suspension and strengthened the chassis to cope with the heavier load and rougher forest roads that a logging truck will see. For a utility vehicle, it manages to look adorable.

More >>



Source: Wired magazine and Youtube

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Log export stats looking good







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NZIF Forester of the Year: Peter Clark

The NZ Institute of Forestry recognised the contribution of two of its outstanding leaders at its Annual Awards Dinner in Nelson last week. Peter Clark of Rotorua received the NZIF Forester of the Year award. The award recognises an Institute member who has made an outstanding contribution to either the forestry profession, or the forestry sector over the last 12 months.

The award recognises leadership, excellence and personal integrity, particularly where this demonstrates the character and strength of the forestry profession, and it is one of the highest accolades the Institute can bestow.

“The Forester of the Year award is a fitting recognition of the contribution that Peter Clark has made to the sector over a large number of years,” said the President, David Evison.

Russell Dale was awarded the Kirk Horn and medal. The Kirk Horn Flask is the most historically valuable award in all New Zealand science. The NZ Institute of Forestry awards the Kirk Horn every second year, to recognise outstanding contributions in the field of forestry in New Zealand.

“Russell has proved himself to be an outstanding leader in forest management and in the management of major industry-funded forestry research programmes, over a long and distinguished career,” Dr Evison noted. “The NZ Institute of Forestry is delighted to celebrate the achievements and contributions to New Zealand forestry of Peter Clark and Russell Dale.”

The election of Steve Wilton of Masterton as a Fellow of the NZ Institute of Forestry was also recorded. The election to this special membership status is granted by a vote of members and recognises the eminence of Steve Wilton in the profession of forestry.

The contribution of Trish Fordyce of Auckland to the New Zealand forestry sector and her long service to the sector in the areas of environmental and land use regulation, and the application of the Resource Management to forestry and wood processing was recognised, by her election as an Honorary Member of the NZ Institute of Forestry.

Photo: Courtesy of NZ Logger

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Contractors embracing safety technology

FIEA's upcoming forest safety conference in August features positive evidence that forest contractors and managers have really embraced new safety applications. The early adopters have proven the new systems are vital to embedding safety in their daily work practices on the forest floor.

Close to 200 forest companies are registered to become certified contractors under a nationwide safety system for forest contactors and managers. The SAFETREE system was developed by industry leaders and led by the Forest Industry Safety Council (FISC) under the leadership of Fiona Ewing. More than 33 companies have now become certified and over 150 are now engaged in the certification process.

FISC engaged the Bravegen team led by Chris Lindley to develop practical software to suit forest-based worker teams and their bosses. A key part of their brief was to ensure SafeTree could be used in a practical way for working safely.

Lindley says there has been a very positive response by the forest industry in general to adopt their new applications. He adds they understand the new certification system is ideal to help them make their businesses safer for everyone out on the forest floor.

Both Chris Lindley and Fiona Ewing are also contributing to a major national conference on forest safety practices in August. The Forest Safety & Technology Conference series will showcase how our forestry leaders have delivered both safety and productivity benefits for people across a range of workplaces.

Registrations are now open for the August 2018 conference series running in Rotorua and Melbourne. Special thanks go to great support from industry, led by principal event partners McFall Fuel and VicForests. Register now at www.forestsafety.events.

Our industry-leading speakers are all practical industry leaders and safety champions. They have come forward to support the 4th FIEA Forest Safety & Technology Conference. This conference series sold out in 2017 and is running again in August 2018 in Rotorua and Melbourne.



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Carbon Match Update

Market Update - NZUs have pushed up to fresh highs today on the back of thin supply and some buyers simply deciding to take the plunge rather than continue to wait.

Consultation on the Zero Carbon Bill closes this Thursday and further consultation on matters pertaining to the ETS is expected in August/September.

Uncertainty about future market design and fundamental ETS settings has been building for some time now. The Carbon Match spread just now probably reflects this. Many natural sellers don't necessarily need to act today, or even soon. Meanwhile, compliance demand builds.

On Carbon Match the offers were lifted at $22.10 early in today's session - up 50 cents vis-a-vis Tuesday last week. With the next chunk offered at $22.35 for the rest of the afternoon nobody seemed quite game but sellers are most welcome to ask. We've some interest now being shown at $22.25.

If you are a seller at some level but you've felt underwhelmed to date, please think again, and feel free to join the offers wherever you see fit.

As of 5pm on Carbon Match NZUs are best bid at $22.00, best offered at $22.25. Thanks to all who showed interest today - the picture is all the clearer for it.

Carbon Match - every weekday from 1-5pm.

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Australia: Harvests at record levels

Commercial forestry plantation harvests at record levels - Australia’s forestry sector continues to go from strength to strength, based on a report released in late May by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES).

ABARES Executive Director, Steve Hatfield-Dodds said, the Australian forest and wood products statistics: September and December quarters 2017, shows the volume of logs harvested reached record levels in 2016–17, exceeding 33 million cubic metres, up 10 per cent on the year.

“In 2016–17, the value of total logs harvested was up 13 per cent to $2.6 billion, driven by a record hardwood and softwood commercial plantation harvest of 29 million cubic metres,” Dr Hatfield-Dodds said.

“Commercial plantation logs now comprise 87 per cent of Australia’s total log harvest, up 19 per cent over the decade.

“The volume of logs harvested from the hardwood plantation estate more than doubled since 2012-13, increasing to 11 million cubic metres in 2016–17 from 5 million cubic metres in 2012–13.

“Hardwood commercial plantations are grown predominantly for pulpwood to meet growing export demand for woodchip, which remain Australia’s largest wood product export by value.

“In 2016–17 exports were also at record highs, up 11 per cent on the back of strong volume growth in woodchip. Roundwood is up 17 per cent and paper paperboard up 10 per cent, with exports of both growing strongly since 2012–13.

“The record 2016–17 log harvest was also supported by Australia’s wood processing industries. Softwood sawnwood output increased by 3 per cent, while production of wood-based panels and paper and paperboard grew more modestly.”

This report provides important updates on key data and trends which provide indicators of the current status of Australia’s forestry sector.

ABARES data continues to assist policymakers and agriculture, forestry and fisheries industry to develop priorities and shape investments into the future.

For a copy of the report visit ABARES Latest Publications.

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Record year for forestry charity

Record year for NZIF Charity Foundation - This year the NZIF Foundation awarded education and research prizes of over $40,000. “For this year’s allocation of funds, we were excited to have more awards, receive more applications and announce a record level for distributions”, said Dr Andrew McEwen, the Foundation’s chair.

“In 2012, the first year of the Foundation’s operation, we had four awards and $6,500 to distribute. For 2018 we had ten award categories. What is especially pleasing is the applicants come from a wide range of institutions and forestry interests, with research projects in plantation forest management, harvesting and trade, social issues, indigenous forests and urban forests.”

The awards were announced at the New Zealand Institute of Forestry Conference dinner in Nelson last Tuesday evening.

Trevor Best, a PhD student at the University of Canterbury School of Forestry received a $10,000 Future Forest Scholarship for his research on the way machine operators in the logging industry deal with stress within their work-life with an emphasis on the implications for their health and safety.

Leo Mercer, a PhD student in environmental studies at Victoria University of Wellington received a $10,000 Future Forest Scholarship for his research examining the role native forest restoration, in association with carbon farming, can play in the development of M?ori land on the East Coast of the North Island.

Mat Curry, a Forestry Science student at Canterbury University received the $5,000 NZ Redwood Company Scholarship.

Logan Robertson, a Forestry Science student at Canterbury University received the $5,000 Invercargill City Forests award, which is available to assist residents of Invercargill City in studies, research or travel in an area benefiting forestry.

The Jon Dey Memorial Award assists research projects in the areas of work-study or new technology aimed at improving forest engineering and harvest productivity. $3,500 was awarded to Cameron Leslie, for his Master’s project on the productivity of winch-assisted machines.

The Otago/Southland Award of $3,000 went to Rhys Black a University of Canterbury student for his analysis of the availability of bulk vessels for log exports, using data from South Port and Port Otago.

The Frank Hutchinson Postgraduate Scholarship of $1,000 went to Yannina Whiteley at Canterbury, the University Undergraduate Scholarship of $1,000 was awarded to Phoebe Milne, a first-year forestry student at Canterbury and the Mary Sutherland Scholarship of $1,000. was awarded to Georgia Paulson, who is in her second year of the Level 6 Diploma in Forest Management at Toi-Ohomai, in Rotorua.

Three forestry students from Canterbury University received prizes in the student poster competition at the NZIF Conference. Ben Reriti received first prize of $800, Millan Visser second prize of $500 and Lauchie Weston third prize of $200.

“We were delighted with the number and quality of applications”, said Dr McEwen. “We congratulate the recipients of the awards and thank all applicants and encourage them to persist with their research and education and to make a career associated with New Zealand’s forests, which have a vital role to play in this country’s environment, economy and society.”

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Forestry trainees to learn while they earn

New scheme allows forestry trainees to learn while they earn - A new forestry training scheme which will enable youth to earn while they learn has been launched in Northland. The scheme could be the answer to the shortage of forestry workers and youth unemployment in Northland.

Associate Minister of Forestry Meka Whaitiri formally launched Tupu Ake, which could be replicated in other parts of Northland last week.

This innovative project sees industry, training providers and iwi coming together to provide a new pathway into trades training. Tupu Ake aims to improve training and increase the number of youth in the forestry industry where currently there is a shortage of skilled workers.

In Northland the industry is worth $1m to the economy. It is this country's fourth biggest earner behind tourism, contributing $5 billion annually to the economy and employing about 20,000 people.

Led by a private forestry contracting company, Forest Protection Services (FSP), the programme offers 15-24 year-olds keen on working in the forestry industry the chance to gain tertiary qualifications, life skills, and, at the end of the 12 month programme full time employment.

FPS has partnered with Te Matarau Trust who will provide the life skills,and pastoral support component of the programme and Northtec who will provide the classroom element to develop the technical skills. Three of the five days is spent working in the forest.

"This transitional care is very important to the success of the programme," says company director Kevin Ihaka.

The students are paid a full time youth weekly wages by the company.

More >>

Source: Stuff news

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Is forestry biomass carbon neutral?

The Carbon Zero Bill - the legislation that will guide New Zealand to becoming carbon neutral by 2050 – is now out for consultation. Wood energy will play a vital role in helping New Zealand transition to a low-emissions future through conversions that replace fossil fuel use for heat and process energy.

It’s very simple to understand that coal, gas and diesel are high-carbon emitting pollutants – but why is forest biomass used to produce wood energy considered carbon neutral?

During their growth, trees absorb carbon from the atmosphere as CO2 and convert it into stored carbohydrates. So when you burn a tree, you're only releasing the carbon that the tree had stored up, carbon that would have been released anyway when the tree died and decomposed.

About 15-20% of a tree is wasted in the forestry wood processing industry. This residue is going to turn into CO2 whether it is burned or allowed to rot.

Most New Zealand forests being logged for industrial purposes are radiata pine, which makes up 90% of the planted production forest area. These fast-growing exotics that rapidly uptake CO2, are grown as a crop and the waste, which can be used for wood energy, is part of a cycle of harvest and replanting.

The collection of wood waste from forestry sites has the collateral positive environmental impact of preventing erosion and damage to waterways. The replanting of forests enables more carbon to be absorbed from the atmosphere through tree growth and creates a carbon neutral cycle.

New Zealand forestry practices are particularly efficient at removing carbon from the atmosphere whereby carbon is stored in building materials and plant regrowth simply recaptures the carbon emissions associated with the biomass energy produced from residues – which has displaced fossil fuel emissions.

Rapid replanting and harvesting of pine is reflected in recent statistics which show an average forest standing age of 17 years. Now supported by the recently introduced National Environmental Standards for Plantation Forestry and re-established Forest Service, New Zealand foresters will be able to better protect the environment while improving productivity and storing carbon in building products.

Furthermore, the current Coalition Government has set a goal to plant one billion trees over the next 10 years. The New Zealand Forest Owners' Association agrees the Government's target of an additional 50,000 hectares of planting a year is "optimistic but achievable".

This initiative will enhance forestry’s role in reducing the effects of climate change by storing more carbon in building materials and providing more biomass fuel for conversions.

During the recent Carbon Zero Bill consultation, it was proposed that more than 3 billion trees would need to be planted to bring New Zealand’s net emissions to zero. No matter the number, planting more trees is a given, and using the residual biomass as energy is naturally a resourceful solution to lowering emissions.

The USA’s Environmental Protection Agency recently announced that it would begin to count the burning of “forest biomass” as carbon neutral. The change will classify burning of wood pellets a renewable energy similar to solar or wind power. The European Union declared all forms of bioenergy to be carbon-neutral in 2009. According to the Guidelines of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, C02 emissions from the combustion of biomass are reported as zero in the energy sector and biomass is therefore deemed carbon-neutral.

Wood energy or biomass, particularly that made from wood waste or forestry residue, captures carbon that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere through decomposition and utilises it to produce energy. When this wood biomass is used to fuel industrial processes or heat buildings instead of fossil fuels, like coal and diesel, carbon emissions are further reduced.

Forest biomass is a sustainable, renewable, carbon neutral energy source. Its use as fuel is cost-comparable to fossil fuels and conversions of industrial plants to wood energy will help New Zealand transition to a low-emissions future.

A graphic illustration of forestry biomass’s carbon neutrality can be found here >>

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… and finally … lawyer speak …

Q: What's the difference between a lawyer and a boxing referee?
A: A boxing referee doesn't get paid more for a longer fight.

----------------------------

Lawyer: I have some good news and some bad news.

Client: Well, give me the bad news first.

Lawyer: The bad news is that the DNA tests showed that it was your blood they found all over the crime scene.

Client: Oh no! I'm ruined! What's the good news?

Lawyer: The good news is your cholesterol is down to 130!

----------------------------

Q: Why were lawyers invented?
A: So real estate agents would have someone to look down on.

----------------------------

As the lawyer awoke from surgery, he asked, "Why are all the blinds drawn?"
The nurse answered, "There's a fire across the street, and we didn't want you to think you had died."

----------------------------

The lawyer's son wanted to follow in his father's footsteps, so he went to law school and graduated with honors. Then he went home to join his father's firm.

At the end of his first day at work, he rushed into his father's office and said, "Father, father! In one day I broke the Smith case that you've been working on for so long!"

His father yelled, "You idiot! We've been living on the funding of that case for ten years!"



Thanks for keeping up with the latest wood news with us!
Have a safe and productive week.

John Stulen
Editor

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