WoodWeek – 2 September 2020

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Greetings from our team logging all of your favourite wood news. Looking to our key log export markets, values into China year-on-year (y-o-y) to the end of July were down 20 percent. Overall log exports mirrored that being down 23 percent across all markets. Logs to South Korea, now our second largest log market, decreased by 19 percent y-o-y to end of July.

This week we have a call for papers for our popular HarvestTECH 2021 conference running concurrently with our Forest Safety and Technology Conference in mid-April. If you’re involved in wood harvesting, you’ll remember well the major harvesting event, HarvestTECH 2019, that ran in Rotorua, New Zealand last year. The event sold out well in advance. It was the largest gathering of its type ever seen in New Zealand with close to 500 harvesting contractors, harvest planners, forestry managers and equipment and technology suppliers into the region’s logging industry attending.

So, our HarvestTECH combined conference will run on 13-14 April 2021. However, the format, because of the uncertainty still surrounding travel internationally and between New Zealand and Australia (and interstate in Australia), for April next year has been changed. See today’s update for more details.

In addition to NZ and Australian contractors and forest managers, HarvestTECH 2019 drew a large contingent of contractors and forest managers came across from Brazil, Chile, Canada, USA, Finland, South Africa and Papua New Guinea.

In other export news, some phytosanitary requirements for forest exports to Australia are changing. As of 31 August 2020, most commodities that require a phytosanitary certificate to export to Australia will exchange these electronically. No physical certificate will need to be printed.

At our major log export port, in Tauranga, their annual report largely reflected the statistics. In the first half of the financial year, log volumes were hit by lower international prices and demand. By March, positive signs were emerging in China, New Zealand’s major log export market, as business there returned to normal and demand increased. Overall, log volumes decreased 21.5% compared with the previous year, to 5.5 million tonnes. Sawn timber exports decreased 10.4% in volume. Pulp and paper exports increased slightly over the full year.

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Log Export Market Update

Thanks to the team at Champion Freight we have the latest log export update for you.

Thanks to the Champion Freight team here is a graphic summary of the latest monthly update for export log markets.

Champion Freight's latest report shows shipments to China month-on-month to end of July were up by 9 percent, thus bumping overall log export values 8 percent.

Log export values to South Korea were up 13 percent month-on-month in July. Logs to India were down a massive 76 percent compared to July 2019, affirming South Korea as our second most important export log market.

Log export values into China year-on-year (y-o-y) to the end of July were down 20 percent. Overall log exports mirrored that being down 23 percent across all markets. Logs to South Korea, now our second largest log market, decreased by 19 percent y-o-y to end of July.





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MPI: Australian forest export standard goes electronic

Forest Products Export Standards – Phytosanitary Requirements of Australia changing - As of 31 August 2020, most commodities that require a phytosanitary certificate to export to Australia will exchange these electronically. No physical certificate will need to be printed.

The exceptions to this are the following, which will require an official copy of the phytosanitary certificate for clearance upon arrival in Australia:

> Timber and timber products
> Prefabricated buildings
> Cane,Rattan, Willow, Wicker
> Permitted plant fibres

For the most recent update as to whether electronic exchange is being implemented for a given commodity, please refer to BICON. (BICON is the Australian Department of Agriculture's biosecurity import conditions database.)

Where a copy of the phytosanitary certificate is still required, the certificate MUST be printed from the ephyto system.

Note: Original paper phytosanitary certificates are still required for all commodities being exported via the mail/passenger pathway.

For full details see: www.mpi.govt.nz/law-and-policy/

Source: MPI



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Port of Tauranga market update

Port of Tauranga Offers Safe Harbour in a Global Covid-19 Storm - Exports decreased 8.0% in volume to nearly 15.8 million tonnes and imports decreased 7.8% to just over 9.0 million tonnes for the year ended 30 June 2020.

In the first half of the financial year, log volumes were hit by lower international prices and demand. By March positive signs were emerging in China, New Zealand’s major log export market, as business there returned to normal and demand increased.

However, forestry was deemed a non-essential industry during New Zealand’s Level 4 lockdown from late March. Log inventory stored at the Mount Maunganui wharves could be shipped to make way for essential cargoes, but cart-in did not resume through the port gates until early May.

Overall, log volumes decreased 21.5% compared with the previous year, to 5.5 million tonnes. Sawn timber exports decreased 10.4% in volume. Pulp and paper exports increased slightly over the full year.

Dairy product exports increased 1.7% to nearly 2.4 million tonnes. Meat products increased 15.4% in volume.


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Call for papers: HarvestTECH 2021

Early expressions of interest are being called for to present at next year’s major wood harvesting and log transport event, HarvestTECH 2021. Early details on the planned event can be found on the event website.

Background:

If you’re involved in wood harvesting, you’ll remember well the major harvesting event, HarvestTECH 2019 that ran in Rotorua, New Zealand last year. The event SOLD OUT well in advance of it running. It was the largest gathering of its type ever seen in New Zealand with close to 500 harvesting contractors, harvest planners, forestry managers and equipment and technology suppliers into the region’s logging industry attending.

In addition to most major New Zealand contractors being at HarvestTECH 2019, a large contingent of contractors and forest managers came across from Australia, Canada, the USA, Brazil, Chile, Finland, South Africa and Papua New Guinea. HarvestTECH 2020, with a focus on wood transport and logistics had been scheduled to run in September 2020, both in New Zealand and Australia. However, because of COVID-19 restrictions, the event had to be postponed.

The plan is to now run HarvestTECH 2021. It will run on 13-14 April 2021. However, the format, because of the uncertainty still surrounding travel internationally and between New Zealand and Australia (and even across state borders in Australia), for April next year has been changed.

So, what’s being planned?

1. One location. Like the 2019 event, the physical event (on-site presentations and trade exhibitions) for HarvestTECH 2021 will again be run in just one location, Rotorua, New Zealand. This enables delegates and exhibitors to plan with some degree of certainty.

2. LIVE + Virtual On-Line Event. Live links from the New Zealand event will be set up for those unable to travel into Rotorua.

3. Alignment with the Forest Safety & Technology 2021 event. As an added bonus, the very popular forestry safety event run by the Forest Industry Engineering Association is also being held at the same venue on the first day, Tuesday 13 April. This will enable delegates from both events to network during the breaks and to capitalise on the large number of trade exhibitions that are anticipated to be present in Rotorua.

Changed format and content:

With the theme of the postponed HarvestTECH 2020 series being on wood transport and log measurement and scaling technologies, this will still be forming an integral part of the planned two day-event in 2021. Day One of HarvestTECH 2021 will focus on log scaling, log segregation and loading, wood transport, logistics and technologies allowing data integration through the wood supply chain.

Day Two of HarvestTECH 2021, like the sold out 2019 event, will detail new equipment and operating practices being used to increase the mechanization, productivity and the safety of steep slope logging, new technology being rolled out by local wood harvesting contractors, the integration of automation & robotics into wood harvesting operations and best practices around ensuring environmental sustainability (roading, stream crossings and harvest residues management) in felling and in extracting wood from the forest.

So, if interested in saving a speaking space within the programme, best get back to us to avoid missing out this time around. Please email your interest through to brent.apthorp@fiea.org.nz BEFORE Wednesday 23 September.

As yet, we haven’t called for interest for those wishing to exhibit at the event. If wishing to express interest in receiving exhibition information as soon as it becomes available, please get in touch with gordon.thomson@fiea.org.nz.



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Considerations for valuing tree crops and land

Are Your Land and Tree Crop Values Additive? - Forest estate owners or managers often separately engage the services of land and forest valuers to assist in the provision of an independent fair value opinion of their plantation estate (land plus trees). Inconveniently, land and tree crop values are not simply additive.

Forest valuation standards place the responsibility to provide an aggregate estate value opinion with the forest valuer. In the absence of clear land value definitions and land valuation processes, the valuation process for the forest estate as a whole may become frustrated, at worst risking a misstatement of fair market value.

Land valuers rely on sales comparison evidence in developing an opinion of the fair market value of land. The mix of transaction evidence in the sales comparison basket is an important consideration. The number of pure plantation land transactions in any given market may be limited, hence sales comparison evidence may be skewed towards the inclusion of agricultural land transactions, as a common example.

These properties are typically traded in a pastured, fenced and watered (PFW) state, unlike plantation forest land which is typically in a planted or cutover condition (i.e. poorly fenced or unfenced, with stumps, no pasture improvements and no or limited water infrastructure for livestock).

In this circumstance, the land valuer needs to take improvements into consideration by deducting the costs associated with achieving a PFW state from the sales comparison derived value to estimate the fair value of plantation forest land.

More >>

Source: Margules Groome


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Consultation on reducing carbon emissions in building

Public consultation has opened on proposals to help reduce carbon emissions in the building and construction sector.

“MBIE is asking for feedback on two documents which will start this conversation,” says General Manager Building Systems Performance John Sneyd.

“The Whole of Life Embodied Carbon Emissions Framework looks at reducing embodied carbon emissions across a building’s whole life cycle, from the production of building materials, all the way through to what happens to the building when it’s at the end of its life.

“The Transforming Operational Efficiency Framework focusses on reducing carbons emissions related to the operation of buildings, such as the use of heating, cooling, lighting, ventilation, and other similar items,” John says.

“We’d like to hear from a wide range of voices and experiences to ensure we get this right.

“This is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to change the way we think about building so we can help deliver the climate change outcomes New Zealand, and the world, is asking for,” says John.

“We’re aware the impact that Covid-19 is currently having on our building and construction sector. This year we want to focus on speaking to the people who will be impacted by any changes, so we can understand their views, and learn from their experiences.

“We expect some initial changes to start being rolled out next year. This a long-term programme, though, which will take place over the next 20-30 years,” John says.

The consultation is being run by MBIE’s Building System Performance team, which was tasked with leading changes in the building and construction sector that are needed to help New Zealand reach its goal of being net carbon zero by 2050.

The consultation on the two frameworks opened on Monday, and will run until 7:00 PM on 30 September. Submissions can be made through the survey on MBIE’s website or by emailing BfCC@mbie.govt.nz.

Source: Scoop News



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Update: Log traders/forestry advisers bill

Forests (Regulation of Log Traders and Forestry Advisers) Amendment Bill - Followers of this new legislation will be up with the play, but for the casual observer, the most recent changes to the bill can be found here: http://www.legislation.govt.nz/.

Alternatively you can read the most recent pdf version of the bill attached here: PDF Download.


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Claymark sale process successful, transition to new owners underway

The Receivers of the Claymark Group of companies – Brendon Gibson, Grant Graham and Neale Jackson of Calibre Partners – are pleased to announce today that they have signed an agreement for the sale of the Companies’ business and assets as a going concern. The agreement is unconditional and settlement is set to occur on 30 September 2020.

The business has been purchased by a consortium led by Paul Pedersen.

Receiver, Brendon Gibson, said “We are working through transition with the purchaser now, with settlement targeted to occur on 30 September. This is an excellent outcome for the business, staff, customers, suppliers and the communities in which Claymark operates.”

Claymark employs 450 staff across its sites, located in Thames, Katikati and Rotorua, and utilises contractors and services from across the Bay of Plenty region.

“Securing a going concern sale in the current environment is testament to the drive and commitment of Claymark’s management team and all its employees”, Gibson said.

Gibson also thanked customers and suppliers for their support through the receivership.

The purchaser, Paul Pedersen, said “We are excited that the acquisition of the Claymark business has come to fruition. We acknowledge the input of the team that have worked tirelessly under difficult circumstances to continue to maintain quality products to markets around the globe.”


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Morocco discovers planting trees slows climate change

Humanitarian crises have recently been declared in Sudan, Yemen, Niger, Mali, and Somalia—affecting at least 450,000 people—due to flash floods and landslides. Areas with low tree coverage and poor soil quality are more likely to experience flood and drought, as the soil is less able to retain excess rainwater.

Countries like Morocco, which are highly susceptible to long periods of drought, are welcoming reforestation efforts to improve agriculture. In partnership with civil society, the Moroccan government will plant 800,000 trees across the country by 2024.

Like Morocco, many are turning to agroforestry, or tree-farming, as an eco-friendly solution to climate issues. Globally, at least 650 million hectares of land (13.3% of total farming land) are used for agroforestry systems.

Planting trees also diversifies farming. Estimates claim forest-farms can be eight times more profitable than staple crops like grain, which can increase farmers’ incomes and reduce rural poverty.

Deforestation and poverty are linked

Almost 30 percent of the world’s 821 million malnourished people live in Africa, the highest prevalence by region. Despite socioeconomic improvements in Morocco (1.7 million Moroccans have moved out of poverty in the last decade), droughts continue to threaten agricultural production, which accounts for 20 percent of GDP and 30 percent of the Moroccan workforce. Low crop yield can exacerbate poverty, especially in rural regions, as two thirds of people who are in extreme poverty work as agricultural laborers.

However, African farmers are beginning to diversify their incomes, a method Morocco has been successful with in improving rural economies and reducing poverty throughout the region. For Moroccan farmers, this has meant investing in cash crops, such as fruit and argan trees, as opposed to producing principal crops, such as wheat and barley.

An oasis in the desert

Forest-gardens, or “food forests,” have been around since ancient times. These cultivated forests contain several layers. The top layer, usually fruit or nut trees, provides shade and traps moisture for smaller edible plants, such as shrubs and root crops.

One of the most well-known forest-gardens in Morocco, located in Agadir, is the Inraren forest, a strip of tropical fruit trees that covers approximately 65 acres. While the exact origins of the forest are untraceable, many believe that it has existed for at least 2,000 years.

The area began as a small gathering of plants, an alternative to transporting and cultivating food sources far away from home. Locals tended the area over thousands of years, creating a support system—beneficial insects, cultivation techniques, and traditional horticultural knowledge. The end-result was the creation of a “self-sustaining” ecosystem, a so-called oasis in the desert, where local produce—goats, chickens, pheasants—could live within and contribute to the survival of the trees and crops.

In addition to food staples and non-native produce, these forests provide shady spaces where cool, moist air can gather, keeping the surrounding land firm and water-retentive. The goal of food-forest developers is to create these forests in areas where the soil is prone to becoming loose and dry.

Resilience by planting trees

In order to combat the effects of global warming, governments are embracing reforestation initiatives. A simple initiative may involve tree planting as an activity. The Chinese government, for example, enacted a program in 1982 to combat the effects of climate change within the country, establishing that all able-bodied citizens between the ages of 11 and 60 have the obligation to plant three to five trees every year. Local governments are required to organize voluntary tree-planting activities that engage all citizens. This ensures that trees are not planted in unwanted areas that could harm the land or the people. Since the program began, a total of 42 billion trees have been planted across the country.

The High Atlas Foundation (HAF), a development nonprofit based in Marrakech, offers a method of reducing rural poverty by providing farmers with natural-grown fruit and nut trees to diversify and boost local incomes.

The approach connects three levels of stakeholders—individuals within the community, government, and local organizations—and provides a solution to barriers local farmers may face in trying to grow their own trees. Local farmers may not have available land or proper equipment to grow saplings from seeds, and nearby nurseries may be too expensive to purchase from.

HAF nurseries use land donated in-kind from donors such as the local Departments of Water and Forests, Ministry of Youth and Sports, and the Moroccan Jewish community. Locals grow seeds within these nurseries, keeping the process within the community. Then tree saplings are sold at reduced prices to local farmers, planted, and monitored for proper growth. In this way, the organization has planted 1.38 million tree seeds this year, partnering as well with Ecosia.

Similar support within the country has helped build women’s argan oil cooperatives, by providing argan trees, thereby reducing inequalities and bringing money back into local economies.

As climate change continues to affect communities around the world, reforestation and tree farming methods provide a solution. However, economic and political aspects of land ownership can challenge these initiatives. It will be important for those who choose to plant trees to do so in the right places.

Source: Scoop News


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... almost finally ... the crafty paper bag with leather feel

Eco-friendly bags using washable paper that looks and feels like leather

An entreprenurial craftswomen in USA has hit on a winning design of quality reusable tote bags. They are all handmade by ger in St Louis, Missouri. Her merchandise is made from eco-friendly, highly durable natural wood pulp cellulose fiber, certified by the Forestry Stewardship Council (FSC) and OEKO-TEX (STANDARD 100). The washable paper looks and feels like leather but washes like fabric. Sustainable, machine washable, and extremely classy makes for an excellent purchase to enjoy for a very long time!

See the bags for yourself here: https://www.iethatis.com

Source: Tree Frog News


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Jobs



Buy and Sell



... and finally ... the midweek laugh - PC hits the waves...

Sign of the times



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News from the UK - The Royal Navy is proud to announce its new fleet of Type 45 destroyers. Having initially named the first two ships HMS Daring and HMS Dauntless, the Naming Committee has, after intensive pressure from Brussels, renamed them HMS Cautious and HMS Prudence.

The next five ships are to be HMS Empathy, HMS Circumspect, HMS Nervous, HMS Timorous and HMS Apologist.

Costing £850 million each, they comply with the very latest employment, equality, health & safety and human rights laws.

The Royal Navy fully expects any future enemy to be jolly decent and to comply with the same high standards of behaviour.

The new user-friendly crow's nest has excellent wheelchair access.

Live ammunition has been replaced with paintballs to reduce the risk of anyone getting hurt and to cut down on the number of compensation claims.

Stress counsellors and lawyers will be on board, as will a full sympathetic industrial tribunal.

The crew will be 50/50 men and women, and will contain the correct balance of race, gender, sexuality and disability.

Sailors will only work a maximum of 37 hours per week as per Brussels Rules on Working Hours, even in wartime.

All the vessels are equipped with a maternity ward, a crèche and a gay disco.

Tobacco will be banned throughout the ship, but recreational cannabis will be allowed in wardrooms and messes.

Saluting of officers is now considered elitist and has been replaced by "Hello Sailor".

All information on notice boards will be in 37 different languages and Braille.

Crew members will now no longer have to ask permission to grow beards and/or moustaches. This applies equally to female crew.

The MoD is inviting suggestions for a "non-specific" flag because the White Ensign may offend minorities.

The Union Jack must never be seen.

The newly re-named HMS Cautious will be commissioned shortly by Captain Hook from the Finsbury Park Mosque who will break a petrol bomb over the hull.

She will gently slide into the sea as the Royal Marines Band plays "In the Navy" by the Village People.

Her first deployment will be to escort boatloads of illegal immigrants to ports on England's south coast.

The Prime Minister said, "Our ships reflect the very latest in modern thinking and they will always be able to comply with any new legislation from Brussels."

His final words were, "Britannia waives the rules."



Thanks for keeping up with the latest wood news with us!
Have a safe and productive week.

John Stulen, Editor
Innovatek

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